Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Data on Countries’ International Trade in Chemicals



The table below show the chemical trade ratio for the 20 countries with the highest gross domestic product (GDP) (determined by the World Bank).  The chemical trade ratio is the total chemical trade (exports plus imports) divided by the GDP.  I would think that the trade ratio is a good indicator of the degree of the role that international trading in chemicals plays in a country’s overall economy.   Three countries (Switzerland, Germany, and The Netherlands) have trade ratios that significantly exceed the other countries.

country
 chemical exports (in millions USD)
 chemical imports (in millions USD)
 GDP (in millions USD)
trade ratio
 exports as % of imports
 total chemical trade (in millions USD)
switzerland
 $      93,276
 $          42,709
 $         659,827
21%
218%
 $     135,985
germany
 $    162,775
 $        116,197
 $     1,466,757
19%
140%
 $     278,972
netherlands
 $      55,296
 $          41,579
 $         770,845
13%
133%
 $       96,875
france
 $      72,793
 $          63,682
 $     2,465,454
6%
114%
 $     136,475
spain
 $      29,204
 $          36,349
 $     1,232,088
5%
80%
 $       65,553
italy
 $      45,237
 $          50,508
 $     1,849,970
5%
90%
 $       95,745
south korea
 $      36,075
 $          35,197
 $     1,411,246
5%
102%
 $       71,272
uk
 $      61,972
 $          61,292
 $     2,618,886
5%
101%
 $     123,264
saudia arabia
 $      14,962
 $          14,150
 $         646,438
5%
106%
 $       29,112
canada
 $      25,847
 $          34,770
 $     1,529,760
4%
74%
 $       60,617
mexico
 $         9,600
 $          26,298
 $     1,045,998
3%
37%
 $       35,898
india
 $      33,472
 $          33,317
 $     2,263,522
3%
100%
 $       66,789
russia
 $      13,866
 $          23,147
 $     1,283,162
3%
60%
 $       37,013
turkey
 $         4,708
 $          17,002
 $         847,749
3%
28%
 $       21,710
australia
 $         9,582
 $          17,694
 $     1,204,616
2%
54%
 $       27,276
indonesia
 $         6,895
 $          13,898
 $         932,259
2%
50%
 $       20,793
japan
 $      47,977
 $          56,873
 $     4,939,384
2%
84%
 $     104,850
brazil
 $         9,144
 $          28,823
 $     1,796,187
2%
32%
 $       37,967
united states
 $    153,231
 $        197,631
 $   18,569,100
2%
78%
 $     350,862
china
 $      99,163
 $        108,583
 $   11,199,145
2%
91%
 $     207,746
total
 $ 2,004,774




The table also shows the percentage that chemical exports are of chemical imports.  Percentages greater than 100 indicate countries exporting more chemical products than they import.

The total chemical trade for the 20 countries represent about 73% of the total world chemical trade (which is about $2.7 trillion).

The export and import data given above were obtained from the World Bank’s World Integrated Trade Solution (WITS) website. (Click here to go to that website’s section dealing with chemical trade.)     The GDP data was obtained from a Wikipedia site (click here to go to that site).  Chemical products are those identified in the United Nations’ system “Standard International Trade Classification – Chemicals (Section 5)”.

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Chemical and Metal Shortage Alert – January 2018

The purpose of this blog is to identify chemical and metal shortages reported on the Internet.  The sources of the information reported here are primarily news releases issued on the Internet.  The issue period of the news releases is January 2018.

Section I below lists those chemicals and metals that were on the previous month’s Chemical and Metal Shortage Alert list and continue to have news releases indicating they are in short supply. Click here to read the December 2017 Chemical and Metal Shortage Alert list.

Section II lists the new chemicals and metals (not on the December alert).  Also provided is some explanation for the shortage and geographical information.  This blog attempts to list only actual shortage situations – those shortages that are being experienced during the period covered by the news releases.  Chemicals and metals identified in news releases as only being in danger of being in short supply status are not listed.

Section I.   Natural gas: China; supply not keeping up with demand
      
Section II.   Shortages Reported in January not found on the Previous Month’s List

Citral derivatives: Europe; production not keeping up with demand.
Cobalt: Japan; sources no longer available
Fracking Sand: Texas; mining not keeping up with demand
Iron ore: Odisha, India; mining not keeping up with demand
Palladium: global; supply not keeping up with demand
Vitamin A and E: global; production not keeping up with demand

Reasons for Section II shortages can be broadly categorized as: 

1.  Mining not keeping up with demand: fracking sand; iron ore
2.  Production not keeping up with demand:  citral derivatives; vitamin A and E
3.  Government regulations: none
4.  Sources no longer available: cobalt
5.  Insufficient imports:  none
6.  Supply not keeping up with demand:  palladium